portraits-of-america
portraits-of-america:

     “When I first started out 25 years ago, I thought medieval reenactment was all about beating people with sticks. I’ve learned since then that it’s much more than that. You learn about camaraderie, loyalty, honesty, working together, being a man—these guys become your extended family.     “I noticed much of that when the younger guys came along. Many of them don’t have fathers, and had never been in a world of men. I grew up in a world of men, where there were very few divorces: for good or bad, you had your father in the house whether you liked him or not. You learned about being a man that way. Many of these kids, they were raised by women. They talk back, they get mouthy.     “Over time, we started noticing a change: some guy starts off as a slacker living in his mother’s basement. Then he gets a job, gets married, and becomes responsible because he is around guys that do stuff, guys that are about being men who take care of the things they are supposed to take care of. These are things people don’t want to talk about anymore. We live in a world of women’s liberation, so we hear ‘You don’t need fathers’ and so on—but these kids do. Growing up fatherless is obviously not working if they are 28 years old and staying in their mom’s basement.”

Fall River, MA

portraits-of-america:

     “When I first started out 25 years ago, I thought medieval reenactment was all about beating people with sticks. I’ve learned since then that it’s much more than that. You learn about camaraderie, loyalty, honesty, working together, being a man—these guys become your extended family.
     “I noticed much of that when the younger guys came along. Many of them don’t have fathers, and had never been in a world of men. I grew up in a world of men, where there were very few divorces: for good or bad, you had your father in the house whether you liked him or not. You learned about being a man that way. Many of these kids, they were raised by women. They talk back, they get mouthy.
     “Over time, we started noticing a change: some guy starts off as a slacker living in his mother’s basement. Then he gets a job, gets married, and becomes responsible because he is around guys that do stuff, guys that are about being men who take care of the things they are supposed to take care of. These are things people don’t want to talk about anymore. We live in a world of women’s liberation, so we hear ‘You don’t need fathers’ and so on—but these kids do. Growing up fatherless is obviously not working if they are 28 years old and staying in their mom’s basement.”

Fall River, MA